Arrested Motion http://arrestedmotion.com "the aim of every artist is to arrest motion..." -Faulkner Tue, 31 Mar 2015 16:00:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Upcoming: Dan Quintana – “Spectres in Grey” @ Galerie Wolfsen http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/upcoming-dan-quintana-spectres-in-grey-galerie-wolfsen/ http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/upcoming-dan-quintana-spectres-in-grey-galerie-wolfsen/#comments Tue, 31 Mar 2015 16:00:28 +0000 http://arrestedmotion.com/?p=273609 11085198_1552363505038188_1928935803_n

On April 11th, Galerie Wolfsen in Aalborg will be opening a solo show from Dan Quintana entitled Spectres in Grey. Judging from the few preview images show here, fans in Denmark will be in for a treat as the Los Angeles-based artist has created some beautifully rendered portraits steeped in the surreal. The palette he has chosen perfectly sets off the imagery as well. Discuss Dan Quintana here.]]>
11085198_1552363505038188_1928935803_n

On April 11th, Galerie Wolfsen in Aalborg will be opening a solo show from Dan Quintana entitled Spectres in Grey. Judging from the few preview images show here, fans in Denmark will be in for a treat as the Los Angeles-based artist has created some beautifully rendered portraits steeped in the surreal. The palette he has chosen perfectly sets off the imagery as well. Discuss Dan Quintana here.]]>
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Auctions: No Longer Empty 5 Year Anniversary Benefit http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/auctions-no-longer-empty-5-year-anniversary-benefit/ http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/auctions-no-longer-empty-5-year-anniversary-benefit/#comments Tue, 31 Mar 2015 11:00:56 +0000 http://arrestedmotion.com/?p=273632 Screen Shot 2015-03-30 at 10.05.19 PM

With the conclusion of the auction set to end tonight at 9 pm (EST), now would be a good time to take a look at what is up for bid in support of No Longer Empty on Paddle8. The conclusion of the auction for the organization whose mission is to activate public engagement with contemporary art through curated, community-responsive exhibitions and educational programs that revive underutilized sites in New York City coincides with the their 5 year anniversary. Many of the artists presented in their past 18 major exhibitions have contributed works but we have our eye on this little Jose Parla piece. Head over here to place a bid. Discuss Jose Parla here.]]>
Screen Shot 2015-03-30 at 10.05.19 PM

With the conclusion of the auction set to end tonight at 9 pm (EST), now would be a good time to take a look at what is up for bid in support of No Longer Empty on Paddle8. The conclusion of the auction for the organization whose mission is to activate public engagement with contemporary art through curated, community-responsive exhibitions and educational programs that revive underutilized sites in New York City coincides with the their 5 year anniversary. Many of the artists presented in their past 18 major exhibitions have contributed works but we have our eye on this little Jose Parla piece. Head over here to place a bid. Discuss Jose Parla here.]]>
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Streets: El Mac – “Juarense y Poderosa” (Mexico) http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/streets-el-mac-juarense-y-poderosa-mexico/ http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/streets-el-mac-juarense-y-poderosa-mexico/#comments Tue, 31 Mar 2015 03:42:44 +0000 http://arrestedmotion.com/?p=273614 574A3007csm

Unfortunately for fans of El Mac, the gifted street muralist has been dealing with health issues as of late. But, luckily for him and us, he's finally feeling a little better and has been able paint on the streets a bit. This latest piece is entitled Juarense y Poderosa and and is one in a series of murals inspired by those who have lost family members to the violence, corruption and injustice that has plagued Mexico for the last near-decade. The Los Angeles-based artist photographed participants in the Caravan for Peace with Justice and Dignity (Caravana por la Paz con Justicia y Dignidad) when it passed through El Paso back in 2012 and chose a young woman from there named Diana who lost her mother to kidnapping for this portrait painted in Ciudad Juárez (at the CEHLIDER building: Calle 20 de Noviembre #4305, Col. El Colegio) with the help of  David "Grave" Herrera. Photo credit: Eric Heights. Discuss El Mac here.]]>
574A3007csm

Unfortunately for fans of El Mac, the gifted street muralist has been dealing with health issues as of late. But, luckily for him and us, he's finally feeling a little better and has been able paint on the streets a bit. This latest piece is entitled Juarense y Poderosa and and is one in a series of murals inspired by those who have lost family members to the violence, corruption and injustice that has plagued Mexico for the last near-decade. The Los Angeles-based artist photographed participants in the Caravan for Peace with Justice and Dignity (Caravana por la Paz con Justicia y Dignidad) when it passed through El Paso back in 2012 and chose a young woman from there named Diana who lost her mother to kidnapping for this portrait painted in Ciudad Juárez (at the CEHLIDER building: Calle 20 de Noviembre #4305, Col. El Colegio) with the help of  David "Grave" Herrera. Photo credit: Eric Heights. Discuss El Mac here.]]>
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Streets: Miron Milic (Rijeka) http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/streets-miron-milic-rijeka/ http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/streets-miron-milic-rijeka/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2015 23:27:39 +0000 http://arrestedmotion.com/?p=273554 miron-milic07

With a lot of street art these days focusing on size, technique, or the decorative side of the work, it's refreshing seeing pieces where concept, background, environment, technique and message come together. Such is the newest mural that Croatian artist Miron Milic recently painted in coastal town of Rijeka. Invited to paint in the city as a part of a modern art museum's project that supports art creation in public, the Zagreb-based artist, painter and illustrator picked an old building in the center of the city as his canvas. The image he created represents the passage and temporary nature of time through portraits of prehistoric humans. Milic had the idea of portraying our ancestors and giving them personality through this piece. At the same time he depicted the Homo sapien as a generic grinning skull hiding behind the fig tree, stripped of any race, gender or other common attributes. He emphasized the message by adding the text "Ima vremena / There's time," parodying the common phrase that is obviously false in this context. His illustrative technique based on rich line work blends the image perfectly with the crumbling walls of the halved building. It's state and segregated placement in the middle of a busy parking lot adds more authenticity and depth to the work, almost giving it a conceptual angle. Photo credit: @arrestedmotion_sal Discuss Miro Milic here.]]>
miron-milic07

With a lot of street art these days focusing on size, technique, or the decorative side of the work, it's refreshing seeing pieces where concept, background, environment, technique and message come together. Such is the newest mural that Croatian artist Miron Milic recently painted in coastal town of Rijeka. Invited to paint in the city as a part of a modern art museum's project that supports art creation in public, the Zagreb-based artist, painter and illustrator picked an old building in the center of the city as his canvas. The image he created represents the passage and temporary nature of time through portraits of prehistoric humans. Milic had the idea of portraying our ancestors and giving them personality through this piece. At the same time he depicted the Homo sapien as a generic grinning skull hiding behind the fig tree, stripped of any race, gender or other common attributes. He emphasized the message by adding the text "Ima vremena / There's time," parodying the common phrase that is obviously false in this context. His illustrative technique based on rich line work blends the image perfectly with the crumbling walls of the halved building. It's state and segregated placement in the middle of a busy parking lot adds more authenticity and depth to the work, almost giving it a conceptual angle. Photo credit: @arrestedmotion_sal Discuss Miro Milic here.]]>
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Previews: “Moleskin Project IV” @ Hashimoto Contemporary http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/previews-moleskin-project-iv-hashimoto-contemporary/ http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/previews-moleskin-project-iv-hashimoto-contemporary/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2015 23:15:43 +0000 http://arrestedmotion.com/?p=273586 Rod Luff

This Saturday night (April 4th), Hashimoto Contemporary will be opening the fourth edition of their Moleskin Project group show. Co-curated by Sydney-based artist Rod Luff and gallery director Ken Harman, the annual exhibition sees invited artists producing artwork on Moleskin sketchbooks, the weapon of choice for many of them for the initial stages of their creative process. In the words of Luff, “The ubiquitous sketchbook is a common ground through which a visual dialogue is exchanged from page to page, forming a colorful language of imagery and experimental use of media throughout the exhibition. In experiencing the multitude of personal realms depicted by the artists, we are drawn to appreciate the seemingly infinite range of creative possibilities that exist within the omnipresent blank page. This show is a tribute to the power of sketchbooks to influence and inform others as well as ourselves.” Participants include: Aaron Nagel, Adam Caldwell, Albert Ramos, Allen Williams, Andrew Hem Andy Espinoza, Brian Viveros, Cannon Dill, Casey Weldon, Chamo San, Christine Wu Craww, DALeast, Damian Chavez, Dorian Vallejo, Frank Gonzales, Graham Curran, Greg Gandy, Helice Wen, Henrik Uldalen, J.A.W. Cooper, Jayde Fish, Jean Labourdette Jean-Paul Mallozzi, Jeremy Enecio, Jeremy Hush, Jeremy Mann, Jessica Hess, Joanne Nam Joel Daniel Phillips, John Wentz, Justin Coro Kaufman, Karla Ortiz, Kate Zambrano, Kemp Remillard, Kim Cogan, Lucy Hardie, Luke Chueh, Martine Johanna, Matt Ritchie, Mike Sutfin, Miles Johnston, Minka Sicklinger, N.C. Winters, Nate Van Dyke, Nimit Malavia Ozabu, Paul Romano, Peter Chan, Randy Ortiz, Rebecca Adams, Redd Walitzki, Reiner Gamboa, Rod Luff (seen above), Ryan Lee, Ryan Malley, Sam Wolfe Connelly, Saner, Sarah Joncas Seonna Hong, Sergio Lopez, Shawn Barber, So Youn Lee, Stella Im Hultberg, Sylvia Ji, Tran Nguyen, Travis Louie, Valentin Fischer, Ville Ericsson, Von, and Zach Oldenkamp. Discuss this show here.]]>
Rod Luff

This Saturday night (April 4th), Hashimoto Contemporary will be opening the fourth edition of their Moleskin Project group show. Co-curated by Sydney-based artist Rod Luff and gallery director Ken Harman, the annual exhibition sees invited artists producing artwork on Moleskin sketchbooks, the weapon of choice for many of them for the initial stages of their creative process. In the words of Luff, “The ubiquitous sketchbook is a common ground through which a visual dialogue is exchanged from page to page, forming a colorful language of imagery and experimental use of media throughout the exhibition. In experiencing the multitude of personal realms depicted by the artists, we are drawn to appreciate the seemingly infinite range of creative possibilities that exist within the omnipresent blank page. This show is a tribute to the power of sketchbooks to influence and inform others as well as ourselves.” Participants include: Aaron Nagel, Adam Caldwell, Albert Ramos, Allen Williams, Andrew Hem Andy Espinoza, Brian Viveros, Cannon Dill, Casey Weldon, Chamo San, Christine Wu Craww, DALeast, Damian Chavez, Dorian Vallejo, Frank Gonzales, Graham Curran, Greg Gandy, Helice Wen, Henrik Uldalen, J.A.W. Cooper, Jayde Fish, Jean Labourdette Jean-Paul Mallozzi, Jeremy Enecio, Jeremy Hush, Jeremy Mann, Jessica Hess, Joanne Nam Joel Daniel Phillips, John Wentz, Justin Coro Kaufman, Karla Ortiz, Kate Zambrano, Kemp Remillard, Kim Cogan, Lucy Hardie, Luke Chueh, Martine Johanna, Matt Ritchie, Mike Sutfin, Miles Johnston, Minka Sicklinger, N.C. Winters, Nate Van Dyke, Nimit Malavia Ozabu, Paul Romano, Peter Chan, Randy Ortiz, Rebecca Adams, Redd Walitzki, Reiner Gamboa, Rod Luff (seen above), Ryan Lee, Ryan Malley, Sam Wolfe Connelly, Saner, Sarah Joncas Seonna Hong, Sergio Lopez, Shawn Barber, So Youn Lee, Stella Im Hultberg, Sylvia Ji, Tran Nguyen, Travis Louie, Valentin Fischer, Ville Ericsson, Von, and Zach Oldenkamp. Discuss this show here.]]>
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Interviews / Studio Visits: ROA – “Metazoa” @ Jonathan LeVine Gallery http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/interviews-studio-visits-roa-metazoa-jonathan-levine-gallery/ http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/interviews-studio-visits-roa-metazoa-jonathan-levine-gallery/#comments Mon, 30 Mar 2015 11:00:52 +0000 http://arrestedmotion.com/?p=273521 IMG_7677-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo

After spending some time with the Belgium-based ROA in Hawaii last month (covered), we followed up recently with a visit inside his studio as he was busy preparing for his solo with Jonathan LeVine Gallery entitled Metazoa at their 529 West 20th Street location. The work for the show was being created during a residency at Mana Contemporary in Jersey City with plans also to paint a mural at a Mana-owned building located near the approach to the Holland Tunnel (more on this later). Along with shots of the prolific artist at work, we can also share an interview we conducted with him that will keep you in the right mood for opening night on April 4th. See you there! Photo credit: Joe Russo for Arrested Motion. Discuss ROA here. IMG_7690-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo Arrested Motion (AM): Can you tell us a little about your upcoming show entitled Metazoa at Jonathan LeVine Gallery? ROA: I am preparing the works in a studio at MANA Contemporary, in Jersey City. MANA is a converted old tobacco factory and the buildings echo the roaring Industrial Age of New Jersey. At my arrival a few weeks ago, they offered me an empty, huge studio that has since been transformed into a furnished atelier. Starting from scratch: making my own worktables, installing a turntable spot, grabbing chairs along the road and of course gathering and organizing the materials that I found in NJ and NY - the space got equipped pretty fast. Because most of the year I am traveling as a muralist, I don’t have a permanent studio, thus all works are made the weeks before the show takes place. The situation and context, similar to my murals, affect in a big amount the outcome of the work. Nothing is planned before, it’s a total surrender of conditions and situations. Thus it’s always a struggle with the given conditions and time. But that’s keeps me naturally and automatically rethinking my new works. The installation of the show will happen the last days at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in NY. Metazoa means literally the animal kingdom and the metamorphosis of an animal’s life. IMG_9452-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: You have mentioned in the past that New York City is your favorite place to paint because of its history and the large walls available. Fast forward five years since those thoughts were shared and with more extensive traveling, can you still say it's your favorite or have the intervening experiences you've had changed your mind? ROA: NYC is the cradle of graffiti and its significance has been shared all over. NYC is definitely a magic place to visit, for so many good things… Since I am here, I extended my record collection with at least 200 records, all of my most wanted ones for very low prices… Yeah NY, NY… Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens and Staten Island. From the Battery to the top of Manhattan. 
Asian, Middle Eastern, Latin
, Black, White, New York you make it happen - and Jersey too. IMG_7684-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: Speaking of traveling - any places you haven't gone to that you think would be a interesting or desirable location for you to paint at in the future. ROA: That’s a hypothetical question. I truly believe that every place has its own original and genuine aspects. In Europe, I would think Iceland, in US New Orleans, in South America Uruguay… Darwin, Australia… and then I want to see much more about Asia, Africa and the Middle East. AM: One of the elements of your work that we find most interesting are the movable panels or interactive nature of your work where the anatomy of your subjects may be revealed depending on how the artwork is positioned. This is an ingenious way to translate some of the dissected imagery you paint on the streets to the gallery setting. How did you come up with the idea? Was there a particular illuminating moment where this way of working came to you? ROA: I consider my works as installations rather than as a canvas. From my first solo in Paris in 2010, I was already experimenting with the interactivity of my work. For me, when I would exhibit, I felt it should be something relevant for myself, and not just a small copy of my murals on a canvas. In murals too, I use the context and the architecture of the location. Sometimes (un)consciously not only the material of the place I am working on, but also the architecture inspires me for the form of the works. The contextual dimension plays a big part in my process in my murals as well as the gallery work. IMG_9501-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: From what we understand, as part of your usual routine for your street pieces, you usually chose local fauna to paint based on the country and region you are working in. Have you ever deviated from this philosophy? If so, for what reason? If not, can you envision a situation where this would be an interesting choice or necessary? ROA: It's definitely true that I choose the native fauna as the subject of murals and exhibitions, but there have been also walls that refer to extinct species or to legends, but rarely I will choose to abandon that idea of painting the surrounding local mammals. Recently in 2014 in Rome, I made an exhibition showing mostly exotic animals, referring to the ancient Roman times where giraffes, rhinoceros, antelopes en masse were transported to Europe to be killed in the circus arenas, but at the same time also referring to the animal trafficking nowadays. It was a choice to not paint the city icon - the Wolf in Roma - like I did a few months before. Both inspired by the history of the city, but both different. IMG_7705-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: You always seem to utilize found materials for your installations as well as to paint on. How do you source these and any interesting stories of how you acquired some of these items? ROA: Mostly, it’s picking up items from anywhere: from scrapyards, dumpster diving, abandoned warehouses, to thrift stores. The materials for Metazoa are collected from Brooklyn, NY and NJ. In Newark, we have been exploring the abandoned Proctors theatre; an amazing site of theatre history, but almost impossible to take stuff out of there, you have to jump off roofs, crawl through windows, climb fire stairs - A Goonies experience that yielded me some props from the projection rooms and some mirrors from the dressing room. The first night of my arrival in Jersey City, my friend and I were wandering around the industrial site of MANA and we find a huge amount of wood. Dismantled structures of MANA’s factory past had been left there to be picked up. All the green wooden panels in the show are the thrown out wood found from that night. Beautiful hard wood, remnants of the lumber industry - old-growth forest wood that been chopped and led to lost territory for many species. Since last week, I am cat sitting and he’s been full time occupied with sniffing around the materials. IMG_9527-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: Oftentimes, your exhibitions are partially set up like a laboratory where various paraphernalia are arranged surrounding your artwork, a natural extension of the anatomic depictions seen in your pieces. Do you have a background in science or just some special love for these wonderfully replicated scientific settings. ROA: A laboratory is a place of research. It also alludes on the history of classical biology and science, and the conquests of the colonization times. AM: We were able to watch you work a little while you were in town for POW! WOW! Hawaii. Any thoughts on your experiences there - the food, culture, people, massive amounts of artists? ROA: POW! WOW! was crazy crowded, but you don’t hear me complaining. It was nice, and I finally got to swim with sharks. Olek and I went shark swimming and we both survived! IMG_9477-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: What do you think of the unique nature of some of these events like POW! WOW! Hawaii or in Miami during Art Basel week where some walls are constantly painted, photographed, repainted on a yearly basis? Or even something like the Le Mur wall in France or Houston Bowery wall in New York? ROA: Interesting question… I’ve done so far Miami, POW! WOW! and Le Mur. Unfortunately, I didn’t get an offer for the Houston Bowery wall, which is the most historical. The first time in Miami, we had to rent a cheap motel near Biscayne Blvd. The guys of Primary Flight fixed me a large wall across the store “Art by God, Nature’s Art and Earth’s Wonders” - this wall was painted over a few years later again, but that’s the ephemerality that used to be a common thing in graffiti. This year, I skipped it like I did two years ago because of some arguable aspects like the whole media circus, the extensive branding and debatable respect to the place itself and to the local artists. Furthermore, I don’t want to ‘claim’ my wall in a rat race with fellow painters. I definitely can’t deny I always feel temped to go to see my friends, as a sort of an annual reunion, but I will only return if I have a good reason to go. Le Mur invited me for their edition 100. I thought it was a honor and I knew it was a project for one month in Rue Oberkampf, a street where I used to rent a cheap room when I went to Paris, so again things personally came together. Le Mur is actually run very well. POW! WOW! Hawaii was great but hectic! The past years, I have been painting in a lot of festivals and the experiences been very varied. Sometimes, you're confirmed months before a wall, and then they forgot to get you the permit, other times they forget to order the paint or lift… On the other hand, I have been in very remote places where everything was sorted out perfectly. AM: Any future shows or projects coming up for the rest of 2015 that you can share with your fans? ROA: I'm suppose to do a lot this year, but first things first - METAZOA. I do have a huge tower waiting for me in Denmark ready to be paint in May though. IMG_7680-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_9480-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_9479-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7716-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7692-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7685-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7681-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7668-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7703-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7698-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo]]>
IMG_7677-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo

After spending some time with the Belgium-based ROA in Hawaii last month (covered), we followed up recently with a visit inside his studio as he was busy preparing for his solo with Jonathan LeVine Gallery entitled Metazoa at their 529 West 20th Street location. The work for the show was being created during a residency at Mana Contemporary in Jersey City with plans also to paint a mural at a Mana-owned building located near the approach to the Holland Tunnel (more on this later). Along with shots of the prolific artist at work, we can also share an interview we conducted with him that will keep you in the right mood for opening night on April 4th. See you there! Photo credit: Joe Russo for Arrested Motion. Discuss ROA here. IMG_7690-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo Arrested Motion (AM): Can you tell us a little about your upcoming show entitled Metazoa at Jonathan LeVine Gallery? ROA: I am preparing the works in a studio at MANA Contemporary, in Jersey City. MANA is a converted old tobacco factory and the buildings echo the roaring Industrial Age of New Jersey. At my arrival a few weeks ago, they offered me an empty, huge studio that has since been transformed into a furnished atelier. Starting from scratch: making my own worktables, installing a turntable spot, grabbing chairs along the road and of course gathering and organizing the materials that I found in NJ and NY - the space got equipped pretty fast. Because most of the year I am traveling as a muralist, I don’t have a permanent studio, thus all works are made the weeks before the show takes place. The situation and context, similar to my murals, affect in a big amount the outcome of the work. Nothing is planned before, it’s a total surrender of conditions and situations. Thus it’s always a struggle with the given conditions and time. But that’s keeps me naturally and automatically rethinking my new works. The installation of the show will happen the last days at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in NY. Metazoa means literally the animal kingdom and the metamorphosis of an animal’s life. IMG_9452-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: You have mentioned in the past that New York City is your favorite place to paint because of its history and the large walls available. Fast forward five years since those thoughts were shared and with more extensive traveling, can you still say it's your favorite or have the intervening experiences you've had changed your mind? ROA: NYC is the cradle of graffiti and its significance has been shared all over. NYC is definitely a magic place to visit, for so many good things… Since I am here, I extended my record collection with at least 200 records, all of my most wanted ones for very low prices… Yeah NY, NY… Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens and Staten Island. From the Battery to the top of Manhattan. 
Asian, Middle Eastern, Latin
, Black, White, New York you make it happen - and Jersey too. IMG_7684-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: Speaking of traveling - any places you haven't gone to that you think would be a interesting or desirable location for you to paint at in the future. ROA: That’s a hypothetical question. I truly believe that every place has its own original and genuine aspects. In Europe, I would think Iceland, in US New Orleans, in South America Uruguay… Darwin, Australia… and then I want to see much more about Asia, Africa and the Middle East. AM: One of the elements of your work that we find most interesting are the movable panels or interactive nature of your work where the anatomy of your subjects may be revealed depending on how the artwork is positioned. This is an ingenious way to translate some of the dissected imagery you paint on the streets to the gallery setting. How did you come up with the idea? Was there a particular illuminating moment where this way of working came to you? ROA: I consider my works as installations rather than as a canvas. From my first solo in Paris in 2010, I was already experimenting with the interactivity of my work. For me, when I would exhibit, I felt it should be something relevant for myself, and not just a small copy of my murals on a canvas. In murals too, I use the context and the architecture of the location. Sometimes (un)consciously not only the material of the place I am working on, but also the architecture inspires me for the form of the works. The contextual dimension plays a big part in my process in my murals as well as the gallery work. IMG_9501-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: From what we understand, as part of your usual routine for your street pieces, you usually chose local fauna to paint based on the country and region you are working in. Have you ever deviated from this philosophy? If so, for what reason? If not, can you envision a situation where this would be an interesting choice or necessary? ROA: It's definitely true that I choose the native fauna as the subject of murals and exhibitions, but there have been also walls that refer to extinct species or to legends, but rarely I will choose to abandon that idea of painting the surrounding local mammals. Recently in 2014 in Rome, I made an exhibition showing mostly exotic animals, referring to the ancient Roman times where giraffes, rhinoceros, antelopes en masse were transported to Europe to be killed in the circus arenas, but at the same time also referring to the animal trafficking nowadays. It was a choice to not paint the city icon - the Wolf in Roma - like I did a few months before. Both inspired by the history of the city, but both different. IMG_7705-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: You always seem to utilize found materials for your installations as well as to paint on. How do you source these and any interesting stories of how you acquired some of these items? ROA: Mostly, it’s picking up items from anywhere: from scrapyards, dumpster diving, abandoned warehouses, to thrift stores. The materials for Metazoa are collected from Brooklyn, NY and NJ. In Newark, we have been exploring the abandoned Proctors theatre; an amazing site of theatre history, but almost impossible to take stuff out of there, you have to jump off roofs, crawl through windows, climb fire stairs - A Goonies experience that yielded me some props from the projection rooms and some mirrors from the dressing room. The first night of my arrival in Jersey City, my friend and I were wandering around the industrial site of MANA and we find a huge amount of wood. Dismantled structures of MANA’s factory past had been left there to be picked up. All the green wooden panels in the show are the thrown out wood found from that night. Beautiful hard wood, remnants of the lumber industry - old-growth forest wood that been chopped and led to lost territory for many species. Since last week, I am cat sitting and he’s been full time occupied with sniffing around the materials. IMG_9527-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: Oftentimes, your exhibitions are partially set up like a laboratory where various paraphernalia are arranged surrounding your artwork, a natural extension of the anatomic depictions seen in your pieces. Do you have a background in science or just some special love for these wonderfully replicated scientific settings. ROA: A laboratory is a place of research. It also alludes on the history of classical biology and science, and the conquests of the colonization times. AM: We were able to watch you work a little while you were in town for POW! WOW! Hawaii. Any thoughts on your experiences there - the food, culture, people, massive amounts of artists? ROA: POW! WOW! was crazy crowded, but you don’t hear me complaining. It was nice, and I finally got to swim with sharks. Olek and I went shark swimming and we both survived! IMG_9477-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo AM: What do you think of the unique nature of some of these events like POW! WOW! Hawaii or in Miami during Art Basel week where some walls are constantly painted, photographed, repainted on a yearly basis? Or even something like the Le Mur wall in France or Houston Bowery wall in New York? ROA: Interesting question… I’ve done so far Miami, POW! WOW! and Le Mur. Unfortunately, I didn’t get an offer for the Houston Bowery wall, which is the most historical. The first time in Miami, we had to rent a cheap motel near Biscayne Blvd. The guys of Primary Flight fixed me a large wall across the store “Art by God, Nature’s Art and Earth’s Wonders” - this wall was painted over a few years later again, but that’s the ephemerality that used to be a common thing in graffiti. This year, I skipped it like I did two years ago because of some arguable aspects like the whole media circus, the extensive branding and debatable respect to the place itself and to the local artists. Furthermore, I don’t want to ‘claim’ my wall in a rat race with fellow painters. I definitely can’t deny I always feel temped to go to see my friends, as a sort of an annual reunion, but I will only return if I have a good reason to go. Le Mur invited me for their edition 100. I thought it was a honor and I knew it was a project for one month in Rue Oberkampf, a street where I used to rent a cheap room when I went to Paris, so again things personally came together. Le Mur is actually run very well. POW! WOW! Hawaii was great but hectic! The past years, I have been painting in a lot of festivals and the experiences been very varied. Sometimes, you're confirmed months before a wall, and then they forgot to get you the permit, other times they forget to order the paint or lift… On the other hand, I have been in very remote places where everything was sorted out perfectly. AM: Any future shows or projects coming up for the rest of 2015 that you can share with your fans? ROA: I'm suppose to do a lot this year, but first things first - METAZOA. I do have a huge tower waiting for me in Denmark ready to be paint in May though. IMG_7680-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_9480-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_9479-Roa-Studio-3_27_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7716-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7692-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7685-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7681-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7668-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7703-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo IMG_7698-Roa-Studio-3_18_15-ManaJC-Russo]]>
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Overtime: March 23 – March 29 http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/overtime-march-23-march-29/ http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/overtime-march-23-march-29/#comments Sun, 29 Mar 2015 11:00:02 +0000 http://arrestedmotion.com/?p=273161 picasso - Les femmes d'Alger at Christie's 2015

More stories from the week that ended March 29 (click on bolded words for more information):
  • Christie's gets $140mil. Picasso for its May sale. Could break the record for most expensive artwork at auction.
  • RIP: William King, who passed away at the age of 90.
  • RIP: Hans Erni, who passed away at the age of 106.
  • Ironworker performing construction on Larry Gagosian's mansion dies after fall from ladder.
  • Los Angeles Unified School District data shows that LA students getting virtual no arts education.
  • Fire destroys building that houses the Fire Island Artist Residency (FIAR).
  • Should MoMA's Klaus Biesenbach be fired over the Björk show and other questionable curatorial decisions? Jerry Saltz burns his MoMA press pass. Other art world reactions to the call for him to leave. Jeffrey Deitch comes to Biesenbach's defense.
  • Artspace has more from the Jeffrey Deitch interview.
  • Bartomeu Marí resigns and Valentín Roma and Paul B. Preciado are fired by MACBA board of trustees.
  • New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman investigating Cooper Union for shady financial dealings.
  • Prime Minister of Tunisia fires six police commanders after lapses in security found following museum attack.
  • Ahmed Sharaf, director of Egypt’s museums authority, arrested on bribery charges.
  • Italian American Museum seeks to evict 85-year old Italian American tenant from her apartment.
  • German court rejects Uta Werner's challenge to her cousin, Cornelius Gurlitt's will.
  • Hiring of Tad Smith at Sotheby's comes with many risks and possible problems.
  • New British copyright law to make copyright breach in Britain a criminal, rather than a civil, offense.
  • Dov Charney sues American Apparel and also wants back his art collection that was in his office.
  • Richard Pfeiffer sues NYPD after he is falsely arrested for a street piece he claims was by Banksy.
  • Open letter from scientists call for natural history museums to cut ties with David Koch.
  • Call for arts institutions to appoint more women to top jobs after National Gallery announces male hire.
  • Cy Twombly sculpture accidentally knocked over and damaged at Menil Collection.
  • National Museum of Damascus racing to package and transport works to save them from looting and destruction.
  • D.C. Historic Preservation Review Board postpones decision to extend historic designation of the Corcoran Gallery of Art.
  • Italian police seize Picasso painting with estimated value of £11mil from pensioner who claims it was a gift.
  • Woman's rights campaign poster designed by the Miami Ad School may plagiarize a work by Pomona Lake.
  • Larry Gagosian's friends and other wealthy patrons flock to Kappo Masa despite bad reviews and overpriced food.
  • The Art Newspaper thinks Italy should sell antiquities recovered by the police to benefit museums.
  • Looted El Greco portrait returned to the heirs of the collection of Julius Priester after settlement is reached.
  • Ben van Beneden, the director of Rubenshuis, deems portrait by Rubens, formerly attributed to follower, as authentic.
  • Scientific testing reveals that painting in Finland's Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation collection confirmed as a genuine Monet.
  • Antoni Gaudi-designed Sagrada Familia church in Barcelona, under construction since 1882 gets assist with 3D printing.
  • When films use copies of famous paintings in its scenes.
  • National Endowment for the Humanities gives LACMA $40k and Ken Burns $1mil. for Vietnam War documentary project.
  • Bennington College recipient of $5mil. gift from Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.
  • Richard Estes' show at Museum of Arts and Design raises the question of art being considered craft.
  • LACMA and Hyundai form partnership on ten-year sponsorship deal.
  • Peter Norton gifts sixty-eight works to The Williams College Museum of Art.
  • A look at the soon to open, new Whitney Musuem.
  • National Gallery of Australia to have naked art tours where visitors can view Turrell show nude.
  • Christopher Knight reviews the William Pope.L show at MOCA Geffen.
  • Málaga poised to become Spain's art hub with two major museum additions.
  • Emmett Till Interpretive Center museum to open in Mississippi.
  • Peter Paul Rubens's portraits of the three Magi have reunited by the National Gallery of Art in DC.
  • The Biennial of the Americas coming to Denver in July.
  • A look at the fate of the Kiev Biennale.
  • Artist list released for first ever Vienna Biennale.
  • Residencies announced for The Shandaken Project at Storm King.
  • A look at how masterpiece paintings are hung in museums.
  • How the bull market for Kazuo Shiraga was built.
  • Artnet's list of blue chip artists that have performed the best from a financial standpoint in the past two decades.
  • Sotheby's May auction includes Roy Lichtenstein painting estimated to sell for $50mil.
  • A look at where Phillips looks to be headed.
  • Auction houses seem to be profiting less as art market heats up more.
  • Interview with Robert Mnuchin about how he started dealing art and his gallery.
  • Sam Wyly talks about having to liquidate his art collection.
  • Scott Reyburn takes a look at the current state of the online art market.
  • Artsy receives an additional $25mil. of investment, led by Catterton.
  • Artnet has a list of 15 galleries in Brooklyn that you should know about.
  • A look at some of the items in Oprah Winfrey's collection as an auction featuring her items is about to get underway.
  • A look at part of Amy and John Phelan's collection in their Aspen home.
  • Artspace interviews Piotr Uklański.
  • Schizophrenic Mexican-American outsider artist Martín Ramírez to have work featured on US postage stamps.
  • Parker Ito talks about his  Château Shatto Gallery exhibition A Lil Taste of Cheeto in the Night.
  • Jacolby Satterwhite discusses the influence of Björk on younger artists.
  • Artspace's list of 7 Masterpieces of '90s Net Art Everyone Should Know About.
  • Paddle8 asks José Parlá some questions.
  • A brief look at Milton Glaser's legacy.
  • Dan Colen curates some songs for the MTV RE:DEFINE auction and gala.
  • Vincent Lamouroux to turn Bates Motel on Sunset in Silver Lake into art project, whiting it all out.
  • Artnet speaks to 7 Women in Contemporary Chinese Art You Need To Know.
  • Amnesty International's Ambassador of Conscience Award goes to Ai Weiwei and Joan Baez.
  • Upper Playground has David Choe greeting card sets available.
  • Brent Ray Fraser paints using his dingaling as the brush.
  • Soho House opening a second members-only Los Angeles location, this time in Downtown LA.
]]>
picasso - Les femmes d'Alger at Christie's 2015

More stories from the week that ended March 29 (click on bolded words for more information):
  • Christie's gets $140mil. Picasso for its May sale. Could break the record for most expensive artwork at auction.
  • RIP: William King, who passed away at the age of 90.
  • RIP: Hans Erni, who passed away at the age of 106.
  • Ironworker performing construction on Larry Gagosian's mansion dies after fall from ladder.
  • Los Angeles Unified School District data shows that LA students getting virtual no arts education.
  • Fire destroys building that houses the Fire Island Artist Residency (FIAR).
  • Should MoMA's Klaus Biesenbach be fired over the Björk show and other questionable curatorial decisions? Jerry Saltz burns his MoMA press pass. Other art world reactions to the call for him to leave. Jeffrey Deitch comes to Biesenbach's defense.
  • Artspace has more from the Jeffrey Deitch interview.
  • Bartomeu Marí resigns and Valentín Roma and Paul B. Preciado are fired by MACBA board of trustees.
  • New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman investigating Cooper Union for shady financial dealings.
  • Prime Minister of Tunisia fires six police commanders after lapses in security found following museum attack.
  • Ahmed Sharaf, director of Egypt’s museums authority, arrested on bribery charges.
  • Italian American Museum seeks to evict 85-year old Italian American tenant from her apartment.
  • German court rejects Uta Werner's challenge to her cousin, Cornelius Gurlitt's will.
  • Hiring of Tad Smith at Sotheby's comes with many risks and possible problems.
  • New British copyright law to make copyright breach in Britain a criminal, rather than a civil, offense.
  • Dov Charney sues American Apparel and also wants back his art collection that was in his office.
  • Richard Pfeiffer sues NYPD after he is falsely arrested for a street piece he claims was by Banksy.
  • Open letter from scientists call for natural history museums to cut ties with David Koch.
  • Call for arts institutions to appoint more women to top jobs after National Gallery announces male hire.
  • Cy Twombly sculpture accidentally knocked over and damaged at Menil Collection.
  • National Museum of Damascus racing to package and transport works to save them from looting and destruction.
  • D.C. Historic Preservation Review Board postpones decision to extend historic designation of the Corcoran Gallery of Art.
  • Italian police seize Picasso painting with estimated value of £11mil from pensioner who claims it was a gift.
  • Woman's rights campaign poster designed by the Miami Ad School may plagiarize a work by Pomona Lake.
  • Larry Gagosian's friends and other wealthy patrons flock to Kappo Masa despite bad reviews and overpriced food.
  • The Art Newspaper thinks Italy should sell antiquities recovered by the police to benefit museums.
  • Looted El Greco portrait returned to the heirs of the collection of Julius Priester after settlement is reached.
  • Ben van Beneden, the director of Rubenshuis, deems portrait by Rubens, formerly attributed to follower, as authentic.
  • Scientific testing reveals that painting in Finland's Serlachius Fine Arts Foundation collection confirmed as a genuine Monet.
  • Antoni Gaudi-designed Sagrada Familia church in Barcelona, under construction since 1882 gets assist with 3D printing.
  • When films use copies of famous paintings in its scenes.
  • National Endowment for the Humanities gives LACMA $40k and Ken Burns $1mil. for Vietnam War documentary project.
  • Bennington College recipient of $5mil. gift from Helen Frankenthaler Foundation.
  • Richard Estes' show at Museum of Arts and Design raises the question of art being considered craft.
  • LACMA and Hyundai form partnership on ten-year sponsorship deal.
  • Peter Norton gifts sixty-eight works to The Williams College Museum of Art.
  • A look at the soon to open, new Whitney Musuem.
  • National Gallery of Australia to have naked art tours where visitors can view Turrell show nude.
  • Christopher Knight reviews the William Pope.L show at MOCA Geffen.
  • Málaga poised to become Spain's art hub with two major museum additions.
  • Emmett Till Interpretive Center museum to open in Mississippi.
  • Peter Paul Rubens's portraits of the three Magi have reunited by the National Gallery of Art in DC.
  • The Biennial of the Americas coming to Denver in July.
  • A look at the fate of the Kiev Biennale.
  • Artist list released for first ever Vienna Biennale.
  • Residencies announced for The Shandaken Project at Storm King.
  • A look at how masterpiece paintings are hung in museums.
  • How the bull market for Kazuo Shiraga was built.
  • Artnet's list of blue chip artists that have performed the best from a financial standpoint in the past two decades.
  • Sotheby's May auction includes Roy Lichtenstein painting estimated to sell for $50mil.
  • A look at where Phillips looks to be headed.
  • Auction houses seem to be profiting less as art market heats up more.
  • Interview with Robert Mnuchin about how he started dealing art and his gallery.
  • Sam Wyly talks about having to liquidate his art collection.
  • Scott Reyburn takes a look at the current state of the online art market.
  • Artsy receives an additional $25mil. of investment, led by Catterton.
  • Artnet has a list of 15 galleries in Brooklyn that you should know about.
  • A look at some of the items in Oprah Winfrey's collection as an auction featuring her items is about to get underway.
  • A look at part of Amy and John Phelan's collection in their Aspen home.
  • Artspace interviews Piotr Uklański.
  • Schizophrenic Mexican-American outsider artist Martín Ramírez to have work featured on US postage stamps.
  • Parker Ito talks about his  Château Shatto Gallery exhibition A Lil Taste of Cheeto in the Night.
  • Jacolby Satterwhite discusses the influence of Björk on younger artists.
  • Artspace's list of 7 Masterpieces of '90s Net Art Everyone Should Know About.
  • Paddle8 asks José Parlá some questions.
  • A brief look at Milton Glaser's legacy.
  • Dan Colen curates some songs for the MTV RE:DEFINE auction and gala.
  • Vincent Lamouroux to turn Bates Motel on Sunset in Silver Lake into art project, whiting it all out.
  • Artnet speaks to 7 Women in Contemporary Chinese Art You Need To Know.
  • Amnesty International's Ambassador of Conscience Award goes to Ai Weiwei and Joan Baez.
  • Upper Playground has David Choe greeting card sets available.
  • Brent Ray Fraser paints using his dingaling as the brush.
  • Soho House opening a second members-only Los Angeles location, this time in Downtown LA.
]]>
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Jen Stark For Facebook Artist in Residence Program http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/jen-stark-for-facebook-artist-in-residence-program/ http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/jen-stark-for-facebook-artist-in-residence-program/#comments Sun, 29 Mar 2015 01:24:09 +0000 http://arrestedmotion.com/?p=273509 11080932_883878551677126_3929389343386371698_n

Continuing to go big with her art, Jen Stark recently completed an installation for the new Facebook building in the Bay Area. With a team of assistants by her side, the Los Angeles-based artist left here colorful make on the inside of the Gehry building for the Facebook Artist in Residence program. The multi-layered psychedelic colors seem to drip down from the edges of the indoor structure mirroring the imagery seen in her gallery work. More photos below... Discuss Jen Stark here.]]>
11080932_883878551677126_3929389343386371698_n

Continuing to go big with her art, Jen Stark recently completed an installation for the new Facebook building in the Bay Area. With a team of assistants by her side, the Los Angeles-based artist left here colorful make on the inside of the Gehry building for the Facebook Artist in Residence program. The multi-layered psychedelic colors seem to drip down from the edges of the indoor structure mirroring the imagery seen in her gallery work. More photos below... Discuss Jen Stark here.]]>
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Upcoming: Seth Armstrong – “The Air is Thick” @ Thinkspace http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/upcoming-seth-armstrong-the-air-is-thick-thinkspace/ http://arrestedmotion.com/2015/03/upcoming-seth-armstrong-the-air-is-thick-thinkspace/#comments Sat, 28 Mar 2015 16:38:11 +0000 http://arrestedmotion.com/?p=273487 duskfromthe27thfloor.2_2

Tonight (March 28th) in Culver City, Seth Armstrong will be presenting new paintings in the main gallery at Thinkspace (concurrently with Erik Jones in the project room). Entitled The Air is Thick, the fresh works are a good example of the Los Angeles-based artist cinematic eye with scenes framed perfectly in mid-action leaving the viewer curious about the narrative. Also, included are pieces from a cool series of connected paintings where Armstrong takes a view from the distance of a residential building and then renders with voyeuristic detail the individuals under observation. Discuss this show here.]]>
duskfromthe27thfloor.2_2

Tonight (March 28th) in Culver City, Seth Armstrong will be presenting new paintings in the main gallery at Thinkspace (concurrently with Erik Jones in the project room). Entitled The Air is Thick, the fresh works are a good example of the Los Angeles-based artist cinematic eye with scenes framed perfectly in mid-action leaving the viewer curious about the narrative. Also, included are pieces from a cool series of connected paintings where Armstrong takes a view from the distance of a residential building and then renders with voyeuristic detail the individuals under observation. Discuss this show here.]]>
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